Kip’s Bay Decorator Show House 2018: Take the Tour Here!

Our team had a blast touring the Kip’s Bay Decorator Show House! The 2018 design house is bright, colorful, and full of fabulous artwork. We especially loved the blue and white bathroom by Mark Sikes, a unique and inviting garden terrace by Nievera Williams Design, and a dazzling, unexpected staircase by Sasha Bikoff. If you have a chance to visit we highly recommend, but if you can’t make it this year you can take a virtual tour below! Scroll down for official details and photography.

Members of The Well Appointed House team: Shannon Larson, Melissa Hawks, Kelly Pinchbeck, Alli Zamora

 

The 2018 Kips Bay Decorator Show House opened its doors to the public on Tuesday, May 1. This year’s group of talented designers have transformed the impressive 15,000 square foot space at 110 East 76th Street with their gorgeous designs. Beginning on Tuesday, the Show House will be open to the public seven days a week starting May 1st through May 31st. The sponsors for this year’s Show House include Kohler, AJ Madison, Hickory Chair, Hearst Design Group, Morgan Stanley, Farrow & Ball, Cambria, AKDO, The Rug Company, Schumacher, Architectural Digest and 1st Dibs.

Here we have included a tour of the showhouse with information on each room and designer:
Walking into B. A. Torrey’s room — “The Afterparty” — is a design cocktail intended to pique the senses. You don’t just look, but touch and feel in this 70s-inspired homage to playful decadence and indulgence. Luxurious textures fill the room, making for a highly tactile environment. From the cerused oak of the custom millwork, brass of the stools and coffee table, crystal of the lamps, plush velvet and mohair of the upholstery, shimmery black and gold wheat inspired fabric of the Hermes throw pillows, and chunky honed stone of the fireplace and bar counter, this room is made to touch.The hushed, private feel of this late-night sanctuary is replete with wrap-around bar, smoking terrace, deep sectional seating and fireplace, and intended for the most discerning night owls. Dark gold-foil cork wall covering absorbs sound and creates a shimmering effect, while the gold-foiled ceiling adds glamour and visual height.
Filled with striking artwork by Kehinde Wiley, Ellen von Unwerth, Charles Lutz, Maynard Monrow, and Andrew Brischler, “The Afterparty” room features a flat-screen television playing a specially commissioned B.A. Torrey video art piece entitled “BONDrian: License to Love”, highlighting James Bond kissing his most notable “Bond Girls,” and set to an ever-changing color wash of Mondrian’s primary colors.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Barbara Ostrom Associates
Room: #9
Name of Room: “Art and A La Carte”
 
I had been going to a lot of art shows and museums over the winter and was constantly inspired by the brilliant use of color and intricate balance each of the artists used in their work. When I was given the dining room to design for Kips Bay this year, I decided to transform the room into the vivid sense of color and excitement I felt when viewing a great painting. I pictured a library/dining room in the home of avid art collectors.  They are a couple who are confident in their unique and eclectic personal taste. They love to entertain friends at home in their library to share exquisitely prepared dinners while having lively discussions on the latest in books, theater and progressive ideas.  They are cultured, widely traveled and sophisticated with a love of dramatic, grand living spaces.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Branca, Inc.
 
My master bedroom was inspired by the sunshine of the south …. this classical tree of life print with its sunshine yellows and sky blues was very warm and inviting… making breakfast in bed something you would want every day! The room was large and allowed me to incorporate a great seating area as well as a large king size bed. Playing the mix of materials, finishes, styles and colors there is everything from natural grasscloth, relaxed lacquer, plexi and brass to giltwood…the art is a mix of a pair of contemporary collages as well as   a 17th Roman still life painting and a great Tina Barney landscape photograph… a Geometric white wool carpet juxtaposed to the exoticism of the rare Anglo-Indian ivory inlaid cabinet filled with a collection of contemporary porcelains and vintage books…. the 1970’s inspired plexiglass and brass bed with my Casa Branca collection custom embroidered sheets… a tray on the bed with breakfast and a favorite book! 
The whole point is that you could live in this bedroom…and should! 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Brian del Toro
 
“Laura’s Bedroom” by Brian del Toro
 
The inspiration for “Laura’s Bedroom,” designed by Brian del Toro, begins with a vintage, hand-painted Robert Chowder screen from the 1960s decorated with birds and flowers in soft beautiful natural tones and pale greens. The color palette and delicate design of the screen provided a lush and feminine focal point for the bedroom. With the decorative screen in place, del Toro set out to find simple, elegant clean-lined pieces of furniture to give the room a more contemporary feeling.
 
The highlight of the furniture is the beautiful shagreen chest of drawers, designed by Alexander Lamont, with amorphic glass pulls. Lyrical midcentury mahogany chairs and a marble-topped console counter-balance the more masculine nature of the chest and the bedside tables. A simple acrylic-legged dressing table sits against an antiqued glass inset panel designed by del Toro and installed in the recess by the window; creating the perfect place to get ready, or sit and check emails before starting one’s day. Lighthearted pieces of art all have a feminine bent to them, highlighted by the large, colorful abstract painting by Lynne Mapp Drexler across from the bed to contrast to the traditional pattern of the screen.
 
The walls are covered in a soft, modern, graphic print fabric from Quadrille, which offers a modern counterpoint to the Robert Chowder screen and pulls the neutral tones from the screen into the room. Del Toro further enhanced the scheme with accents of pale pink throughout the room. He papered the ceiling with a soft cork wallcovering with gold accents from Innovations. The custom bed’s design is simple and tailored. Wonderful iridescent silk curtain fabric marries the greens, roses and neutrals in the room. Del Toro continued the greens from the screen into the vestibule with a Farrow and Ball wallpaper, which he hung upside down to create a naturalist reference back to the focal point, the floral screen.
 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

Bunny Williams Inc.
 
“GILDED KNOTS” – ROOM# 7
Bunny Williams & Elizabeth Swartz
 
“Imagine that you have a very comfortable Living Room in a Tree House, where you can look at the sky through gilded leaves and watch a spider make a giant cobweb”

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Clive Christian
 
Kips Bay 2018 Kitchen
 
The Clive Christian kitchen features the contemporary Metro Deco cabinetry range-perfect for this Manhattan townhouse setting. Each piece of rich Walnut cabinetry has been handcrafted in our company owned UK workshops using the finest materials sourced from around the world.  The kitchen is a perfect meeting of precision and technology with centuries old artisan techniques.
 
The geometric marquetry panel above the hearth is made up of hundreds of machine cut veneers, each hand-set at our factory by our master marquetry craftsmen.  Aqua dyed veneers in the marquetry panel tie in aqua leather lined cabinet backs, adding a pop of color to the warmth of the walnut, while two sparkling Baccarat crystal chandeliers add texture and movement to the space. 
 
Clive Christian is a truly custom and bespoke product.  From the first pencil sketch, each design component is carefully considered to deliver a one of a kind design scheme for each individual client.  Our highly skilled and experienced designers will ensure the Clive Christian philosophy of creating interiors personalized to both taste and space.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Dan Fink
 
Diana’s Stair
 
Upon first walking into the house, I noticed the exquisite classical stair rail that drew the eye up through its great expanse. How to carry forward classical ideas and details and make them relevant for today? This is at the heart of what we do. I paired the rail with a graphic and gilded wall covering that we designed in collaboration with Gracie Studio. It dances its way through this main artery room, and at times gives a subtle and shimmering sense of architecture and composition.  
 
The furnishings are old and new. A romantic Italian bombe commode, from Chinese Porcelain Company, lends its storied past, flanked by the more stoic Sorney chairs. At its heart is a Leleu table that is a landing place of objects and memories collected with time, and a relief of the mythical huntress, Diana, shooting her arrow up the stair and into the sky. I wanted the space to have a quiet glamour, grace, and strength, as though the modern Diana might live here were she around today. It’s in their balance that all of her unique and beautiful pieces come to rest. 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
David Netto Design LLC
 
The New York I grew up in was full of red rooms. There was Brooke Astor’s famous library, and Mario Buatta’s incredible room (was it in 1980?) at the Kips Bay house at 15 East 66th Street…Red, in particularly A glossy DARK red LIKE BOURBON OR MAHOGANY, is a color that has glamor and a certain association with the 1980’s. That makes me enjoy it even more now, since that was the time that “made” my taste. Red also has the practical consideration of making people hungry, which not many people know but is true, and this is a kitchen after all
 
For my first time doing Kips Bay I wanted to remember all the red rooms that had meant so much to me in my early life, by decorators I admire like Mario and Albert Hadley, and try to add one to that story. The envelope is about that—glossy tortoiseshell red walls, DARK FOR NIGHTTIME GLAMOUR, with lots of mirror. But the contents are about looking forward, and who I am as a designer. I love big chunky modernism by Charlotte Perriand that looks handmade, and combining a Louis XV chair with it. I love black and white fabric and rugs, and any room to me gets younger with a little yellow. I love Ellsworth Kelly, who got younger as he got older, and was completely unafraid to do too little. I love combining an old and patinated limestone mantel with all these modern things–and irreverent things, like the bird table by Lalanne.
But mostly I love a room full of books, and any good decorator knows making something a library is the easiest route to success. I wrapped the books in mysterious white sleeves because I thought a Kips Bay house is all about dreams; dreaming of what a house will become, dreaming of who lives in this fantasy room, or who WILL live here–and I like a room to be a portrait, so I had to leave this one a little unfinished.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

Drake | Anderson
 
A bold, yet nuanced palette of saffron, ochres and umber envelope Drake/Anderson’s plush, luxurious salon. With several dialogues in concert – modernism and classicism, color and texture, materiality and form – the room harmoniously blends multiple design languages with grace and gravitas.
 
In the salon, a 19th Century English Regency mantle creates a classical focal point; the honed statuary marble contrasting elegantly with the glossy lacquered saffron surround. A contemporary mirror by Erwan Boulloud, playful in its form, reflects the room’s rich coloring as well as a prototype chandelier by Mathieu Lustrerie. The notion of shimmering elements is suggested throughout the space– from the crystals of the chandelier to the beads and sequins hand-sewn by Ankasa on a Lelievre fabric that organically marble their way up the upholstered walls.  A design by Drake/Anderson, the sofa is upholstered in a deep ochre velvet and sensually curves opposite a pair of 19th century chairs, each covered in a striking geometric fabric. Asymmetrical cocktails tables in brass and tiger’s eye gemstones make a sculptural statement in the seating group. The salon is carefully curated with numerous artworks; a large black and white abstract painting by Nicholas Carone mingles with a mélange of works by James WalshAlfred Maurer, and Charlotte Park. An impressively-scaled bronze sculpture by Atelier Van Lieshout adds complexity and lends a feeling of the unexpected. Shimmer continues in the adjacent jewel-box bar as the walls and ceiling are ornamented in a traditional grid pattern using smoke, gold, and clear mirrors. Floating in the room, the Drake/Anderson designed bar is monolithic and focal, and above hangs a dramatic five tier Murano glass chandelier.
 
Sophisticated, luxurious, and dramatic, the salon is a pure portrayal of Drake/Anderson’s design philosophy, where Artisan and contemporary pieces meet elements from days past; each item singular, yet better together. Everything combines to create an interior that is refined, glamorous, and resolutely livable. 

Drake+Anderson

Drake+Anderson

Drake+Anderson

Drake+Anderson

 
Juan Montoya Design
Name of Room: The Moonlight Room
 
When I gazed into the celestial sky one evening, a vision of this room appeared to me; hence the designation “Moonlight”. I envisioned a space driven by cosmic forces united with elements from different eras throughout time.
 
An abstracted silhouette of the moon is reflected in the carpets and the wall surfaces. The scale of the ovals dance with one another and engage with the geometry of the space, as if the lunar sphere itself is shifting through its phases as it moves gracefully through the night sky. This ever-changing, yet eternal, orbit pulls you effortlessly through the room.
 
With an homage to that heavenly geometry and order, each piece was carefully curated, adding layer upon layer of depth to space and meaning.  The early 20th century chandeliers contrast with the cubistic wall paneling, hanging like brilliant miniature moons in their own right. The clean linear form of the sofa evokes a different era which, in turn, compliments the soft circles of the contemporary carpet. Every diminutive detail was significant in this celestial convergence of creation and the result is a timeless, sacred retreat.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Katie Ridder Inc.
My room was conceived as a guest bedroom – a calm retreat of sorts from the hustle-bustle of New York City. Intentionally feminine, comfortable and serene, the concept started with the premise that the walls would be a special pink from Farrow and Ball. The walls are tailored by curvilinear, red stencil borders executed by my long-time, favorite decorative painter, Chuck Hettinger. To expand the space and anchor the bed I chose to mirror the entire north wall of the room, while tempering the power of the reflections by adding a round mirror above the headboard. Adding an architectural note to the space, I commissioned a four-poster bed by Anthony Laurence Belfair. The profile of the posts was inspired by a chair leg in ALB’s showroom but the effect is more abstract and sculptural.
 
For the carpet, I chose an Oushak with pretty reds, pinks and blues with synch perfectly with the pink and red walls. To add style to the functional necessities, I lacquered the bedside tables and upholstered the headboard and footboard in faux fur. The coloring of the fabrics from pink to green to yellow (Name colors) plays off the pink walls and special details like the curvy teddy bear fringe on the Roman shades suggest a whimsical spirit. The result, I hope, is a room my guest would be happy to return to after a stimulating day in the city.
 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

Marcia Tucker Interiors
 
Marcia Tucker Dressing Room and Master Bathroom
 
The Dressing Room concept is historically inspired and thoroughly modern. Not to be confused with a closet for storing clothes, the Dressing Room is a staging area for the fashion lover who loves to plan her look of the day: to style an outfit or two for a work event or a weekend getaway. Inspired by Barneys Fashion Director Marina Larroude, the Dressing Room is filled with a playful mix of iconic and of-the-moment pieces from Barneys. Designer Marcia Tucker upholstered the walls in sumptuous Dedar fabric, which are surrounded by custom millwork by Ornare and completed with a pearl necklace-inspired création lumineuse, or light sculpture, from Semeur D’Etoiles. This dressing room was created with an aesthetic full of authenticity and personality, whilst remaining timeless.
 
The Master Bathroom is a peaceful sanctuary, designed to ensure complete relaxation, focused on personal wellness and offering escape from the distractions and chaos of daily life. While the rest of the home has become open-plan to suit modern, sociable lifestyles, the bathroom has become even more private. The modern Master Bathroom as designed by Marcia Tucker is a spa, sanctuary, and recharging station – not to mention art gallery – and is more lavishly designed than ever before. With a wall of live greenery from Magnaflora providing pure and fragrant air, top-of-the-line fixtures from Kohler featuring new rose gold finishes, accessories from Hermes, and a stunning light sculpture by Arturo Alvarez, the Master Bathroom engages all five senses.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Mark D. Sikes
 
SLEEPING BEAUTY 
Mark D. Sikes creates a beautiful boudoir fit for a princess at the 2018 Kips Bay Show House.
A custom hand-painted Gracie scene is the perfect backdrop for this bedroom that features Mark’s new fabric collection with Schumacher. Antiques from James Sansum that once belonged to C.Z. Guest and Bunny Mellon are mixed with 18th century European treasures from Carlton Hobbs. Mark’s room is not only beautiful, it’s comfortable, inviting, the ideal place to rest, to read a book, write a note, or even have a drink. 
The room is full of timeless style, glamour and beauty, yet approachable, inviting and comfortable. Delicate Porcelain flowers by Valdimir Kanevsky sit adjacent to modern art by Kit Reuther, Blue and White Ikat’s mingle with chinoiserie, dhurries from England dance with gilt, batiks flirt with bullion’s, and stripes play along side of layers and layers of trims and embroideries.
Through the years there have been a lot of pretty bedrooms at Kips Bay, but this will be the room that redefines Sleeping Beauty.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Mark Hampton, LLC
 
Our room at this year’s Kips Bay Show House is the “Olympia Folly.” Born out of my ever enthusiastic and growing neo-classicist tic, I have been dreaming of campaign tents. This has led me to my first ever collaboration with De Gournay, in the creation of the draped interior of a Greco-Roman tent straight out of my decorator’s imagination – and mapped onto paper by my now-two-time Kips Bay collaborator: the artist Chuck Fischer. 
 
With its surrounding backdrop of soft hanging textiles, an idealized view of Greek temples emerges in the background, framed by Aleppo pines and Cypress trees. In the foreground are discarded Roman helmets and a propped up shield. 
 
Clearly, I have seen Gladiator one too many times. 
 
The interior furnishings of my Mediterranean oasis are filled with what are, to me, the necessary, final visual tropes for this fantasy to be complete: animal skin patterns evoking the hunt, – another routine activity of the bivouac, – rich, sumptuous fabrics and trimmings, fit for a king. Nods to Empire building are sprinkled throughout, as are the Classics of the classics: temple fronts and a Klismos chair. 
 
You might ask, what happens to all of this when the show house closes down? I will share: as much as I can, I am taking it home with me. Maybe then, I will be a little less obsessed. 
 
Maybe not. 
Michael Herold Design
 
Michael Herold – Space 1/Foyer
 
As you step into the entry foyer of this year’s Kips Bay Showhouse, one is instantly transported into a place far from the hustle and bustle of city life.  Drawing inspiration from his recent travels to Europe, Michael Herold chose a Nicolas Poussin inspired 17th century landscape wallpaper by Iksel Decorative Arts to adorn the walls.  The fine details of the classic Italian scenery draw you in and make you feel as if you have stepped into an Old Masters painting.  A strategically placed wall of mirrors gives the illusion of an infinite countryside landscape. 
 
Michael Herold chose the Alexander McQueen Monarch rug in smoke tones to help ground the entry foyer and to juxtapose abstract forms with the traditional landscape wall mural.   A matching pair of antique bachelor chests flanks each side of the room and creates dynamic focal points for displaying collections of modernist sculptures and art.  The Joan Miro lithographs seamlessly blend 17th Century and 20th Century art forms to create a classically inspired yet modern space.  Instead of adding a punch of color, Michael created a visually graphic moment by using a bold horizontal striped fabric on all of his upholstered seating.  He also chose to dress the two windows with Shade Store relaxed roman shades using a light and airy Schumacher silk cloud-patterned fabric to allow natural light into the foyer.    
 
Michael Herold adorned the walls and ceiling with gold leaf light fixtures to add richness and depth to his eye-catching design.  The entry foyer is scented with Jo Malone Lime Basil & Mandarin scent surround diffusers to help create a lasting impression. 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Nievera Williams Design
Garden Terrace
 
It’s always very difficult to come up with a landscape design concept for a showhouse outdoor space. When Schumacher graciously offered to collaborate with my space, I researched their fabric archives to come upon their ‘Citrus Garden’ pattern originally designed by Josef Frank in 1947.
 
Mr. Frank was a bit of a ‘rebel’ amongst his peers, as he believed design should be ‘accidental’, contrary to the controlled design of the machinist age prevalent during his career. He also believed that homes should have a direct connection to the outdoors. His completed projects always incorporated colorful, leafy fabrics (of his design) which reflected the adjacent outdoor gardens.
 
Our garden design is inspired by Schumacher’s ‘Citrus Garden’ pattern and the design work or Josef Frank.  Lush plantings, and climbing vines are evocative of the fun, playful and cartoon like images within the fabric. The dark modernist outdoor furniture contrasts with the organic, jungle-like planting. Folly’s like the bird cage, and the multi-sphered topiary plants add a sense of humor emphasizing the accidental’ design of the space.  Not dissimilar from Mr. Frank’s era of the machine age, our technology driven life should be fun and lively.  We believe the garden, as an extension of the home, should be designed to bring joy to our everyday lives! 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Pavarini Design
 
This is Pavarini Design’s 6th Kips Bay Showhouse room, and it will be known as a
Home Wellness Retreat, for Mind, Body, and Spirit
 
Pavarini’s Home Wellness Retreat for mind, body, and spirit balances residential interior design concepts with Ayurvedic elements to unify the design vision through the physical and metaphysical.  Each element within the space has been carefully chosen to be non-competitive and rooted in the ancient philosophies of well-being to promote a luxury environment that gives individuals the opportunity to truly relax and mentally escape the over-stimulus created by every-day electronics.  Encouraging practice of meditation, massage, and light physical activity such as stretching and yoga, the space motivates one to get in-touch with the creative self by embracing the senses. The harmony created by the relaxing sound of water trickling into the pool, the sight of lush greenery from the private garden, and the nourishing effects from liquid fasting and juicing fosters healthy routine, “It’s our responsibility as Interior Designers to ease the spirit and to make people feel good about themselves by bringing function, great design, and peace to their home environment.” –C. Pavarini III
 
Executed in a subtle color palette of pale grays, silvers, and subtle hues, the furnishings scheme is intended to envelop the room and to be soothing on the eye to allow the metaphysical components to subliminally nourish the human spirit.  An abundance of natural crystal and a fine curation of art work and commissioned pieces bring deeper meaning, thereby creating sanctuary in this luxury residential home retreat.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Phillip Mitchell Design
 
The Drawing Room
Philip Mitchell Design Inc.
 
The Drawing Room is inspired by the history of family and the love of collections. I grew up split between a traditional family home in the Canadian countryside and the urban contemporary sprawl of Los Angeles. In either reality, I was surrounded by luxurious details; antiques, custom upholstery, window coverings and cushions in fabrics that were rare or hand-woven artistry and even lampshades that were bespoke. My mother made each space about comfort first; personal touches, classic pieces mixed with some whimsy – her character and how she loved to live clearly showed through our homes. The Drawing Room is curated diversity within a space. It’s a place I see my mother and other fascinating personalities mingling, sipping cocktails, discussing art and life and everything in between. 
 
Architectural detailing is essential to my design process, as it provides a context and a canvas on which I begin to layer with colour and texture. Wall coverings, carpets, window treatments and upholstery are all extensively researched and often are bespoke pieces of artistry unto themselves. These hand-treated commissions make the design even more meaningful. I focus on curating timelessness and I do this in The Drawing Room by selecting pieces from different design periods, diversifying materials, layering styles and building a story for the room to tell. 
 
Art selection and placement is integral to my process as well as the story the room tells about the people it serves, which is why we have included collections in The Drawing Room. People love certain things and get attached to them from when we’re children right up to adults. We start collecting things for passion and souvenir and as I do this myself, I wanted to fill the room with these things of beauty which personalize the space and inspire a sensation of intimacy. The Drawing Room is about the nostalgia I have for all that is grand about living well with beautiful things and entertaining enchanting people. 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 

Sasha Bikoff
 
When I was first presented with the opportunity to design the staircase in the famed Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse, I knew it wouldn’t be an easy feat, especially because the space itself was a challenge in its layout. The staircase spirals up the house with narrow landings on each floor, and given the complicated shape, I wondered how I was going to make this untraditional space a spectacular moment. Most importantly, I wanted it to be both aesthetically pleasing to the guests and meaningful to the kids of the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club—the young group of people we are all doing this for. Before I even started making fabric selections and pulling paint swatches, I knew I wanted my space to speak to the kids and show them that their creativity should always be ignited when it comes to achieving their dreams.
 
For my design, it was important to me to stay true to my brand DNA and also my motto that design should be as fun as it is worldly and intellectual. I have always been a fan of Memphis Milano so something I knew would resonate well are the colors and patterns of this 1980s Miami design movement juxtaposed with the Old World European traditional architecture of the showhouse. The space needed to be more than just an ode to the past; it needed to both sing the praises of the past and look to the future.

I was inspired by the simple shapes and motifs (such as zig-zags, polka dots, squiggles and pyramidal triangles) in the work of Memphis Milano designers Ettore Sottsass and Alessandro Mendini. These shapes, when combined, create a sense of movement that I wanted to evoke on the staircase as you transition from room to room. I also worked with The Rug Company on a fun and modern custom rug for the stairs, which is the first highlight of the space, as it sets the pastel color palette. On the walls, I worked with Voutsa for a more contemporary vibe while still complementing the existing colors, shapes and movement. To complement these design periods even further, I used blown up polaroids of supermodels, rappers and pop stars on the walls as well as mirrors from artists like Chris Schanck and Misha Kahn. Vintage light fixtures adorn the walls and Farrow & Ball gloss paint was used for the ceilings. Think canary colored ceilings with baby blue and lime green mouldings. As guests walk up or down, I want them to see a technicolor dream.

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

 
Scott Sanders LLC
 
“A Powder Room with Personality”
by Scott Sanders
Tucked between the piano nobile gallery and dining room of this year’s imposing townhouse, designer Scott Sanders chose a decidedly masculine, “gentleman’s library” aesthetic for the essential powder room. It is both tailored yet moody, with distinctive elements carefully selected to insure appeal to either sex. Experienced solo or a deux, as so many powder rooms are, this jewel box is the perfect place to escape from the maddening crowd to exchange a bit of gossip, touch up lipstick or straighten a tie, discretely respond to a text message or, quite frankly, answer nature’s call.
The walls are covered in de Gournay’s new bas relief “Labrado” wallpaper, which has been hand painted to replicate the look of tooled Moroccan leather. Kohler fixtures in dramatic black with chic “Pinstripe” fittings in brushed bronze respond perfectly to the traditions of classic Park Avenue elegance, along with deluxe crocodile accessories. Extraordinary photography and fine art, including Harry Benson’s iconic 1964 shot of the Beatles’ Pillow Fight at the Plaza Hotel and a pair of exquisite 18th century Goya etchings, complete the composition.
 

 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

Steilish Interiors & Architecture
A Room “with” a View
 
by Steilish Interiors & Architecture
 
With a nod to the 1985 Merchant-Ivory film “A Room with a View”, this space pays homage to the lush romance of Italy, the unending pursuit of beauty and joy, and a pronounced love of nature and form. A transitional space in which to leave the city (and its cares) behind, the small sitting room is meant for tranquility and contemplation. To encourage a pause between the urban exterior and the private interior of the home, the space and its design details evoke a courtyard—a place to sit and read, to reflect on the day, maybe even to get a little work done.
 
Traditionally, this is where you would find the entryway and pantry—hardworking spaces kept largely out of view. In this unremarkable L-shaped, windowless space, two distinct areas with harmonious proportions were created. To make the spaces more visually inviting, experiential, and appealing, multiple views were framed, creating focal points in the distance. Walls were angled to help focus the eye and craft stimulating perspectives.
 
The vistas introduced offer one’s tired eyes a pretty spot on which to rest, or focus, depending on the mood. The most impactful such view is Markus Brunetti’s oversized photograph of Cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta in Siena, which functions as a “window.” At first glance, the work calls to mind the classical architecture that has drawn visitors to Italy for centuries. But Brunetti’s process (piecing thousands of photographs into one composite image) invites closer study of the hyper-realistic façade. The artwork also informs the room’s color palette—blush pink, gold, and black.
 
Considered details abound throughout the design, each playing to the contrasts between interior and exterior, hard lines and soft contours, nature and habitation. The pink marble bench reinterprets garden seating, a place to take off one’s shoes and remove any remnants of the outdoors. A collection of vintage wooden walking sticks mounted above the bench hints at the room’s original purpose (a mudroom). Its curious appearance is a reason to stop and linger. Black stone tiles with chiseled edges and a hand-sculpted finish cover the floors throughout. Strié wallpaper, hand-torn into large blocks, is stacked and applied in a pattern reminiscent of a classical stone façade; the dark tones of the wallpaper keep the room in the present tense rather than the past. Curvilinear and angular furniture pieces as well as a richly textured, hand-braided rug were chosen for their sculptural quality. On the ceiling, a branch pattern and ethereal, cloud-like light fixtures made of polymer resin present their own beautiful, “natural” views. (As George Emerson remarks in the film, “My father says there is only one perfect view, that of the sky over our heads.”)
 
More than anything, the space reinforces an appreciation for the constant interaction between indoors and out, and the notion that there is always something to admire in each. Like Miss Honeychurch, the film’s spirited protagonist, the room presents a quiet but forceful rebellion against the conventions of the day.
 

 

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

2018 © Nickolas Sargent Photography

Wesley Moon Inc. Design & Decoration
 
Wet Bar / Butler’s Pantry / Elevator Landing
My space is actually made up of three separate rooms with three distinct functions – the wet bar, which is a public space for entertaining, the butler’s pantry, which is traditionally a back of house space for plating food and storage, and the elevator landing, which is a transitional space. My goal was to create one cohesive design to unify all three areas while still maintaining the purpose of each, and to force all three spaces equally into the public domain. To achieve this end, we gutted the space, created wider openings, and installed all new cabinetry, flooring, finishes, and fittings. We also reworked all of the lighting, ceiling designs, and even the HVAC ducts. The result is a series of three complimentary little jewel boxes that can also stand alone.
The wet bar is a decidedly masculine space. I simply wanted a stunning bar that feels more like furniture than kitchen cabinets. We incorporated a huge amount of architectural lighting to make the bar glow like a beacon. The countertop and back wall are covered in a dark Belgian Bluestone. The heaviness of the stone is offset by the textured Eglomise glass that frames it, and the cerused oak and horsehair of the cabinetry adds richness. To create architecture in an otherwise stark space, and to balance the modernity of the bar, we installed plaster fluted corner columns and panel moulding that nod to the original details the house may have once had. To cover the walls, I created digital wallpaper murals using the archives of medieval hymnals from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The room is finished off with significant contemporary furniture and lighting fixtures, as well as artwork that is also a modern twist on historical imagery. 
To bring the Butler’s Pantry out of the shadows, I widened the doorway so the space can be seen clearly all the way from the stair hall. I wanted to create a modern take on a gilded age butler’s pantry, keeping in mind that today this is a room that isn’t only accessible to servants. In a modern home, everyone may use this space, so it had to be beautiful as well as functional. Along with Clive Christian cabinetry, I designed a glass-front china cabinet lined with a citrus Holland & Sherry silk to house a stunning set of China by Richard Ginori. The cabinet is centered on the doorway for dramatic effect and to entice visitors to come on in. To offset the dark masculinity of the wet bar, I gave this room white marble floors from Akdo and bathed the cabinetry in a pearlescent paint finish by Lapolla to compliment the Mother of Pearl backsplash tiles from Paris Ceramics. The Fayce wallpaper adds joy to the room and the large painting by John Moore adds airiness and a “view” to the otherwise windowless space. 
The elevator landing is a small but highly visible space. I wanted it to hold its own against the other two more elaborate rooms. I instantly thought of a giant mirror by Bill Cunningham that I saw at Jonathan Burden. It’s huge and festooned with feathers. I knew instantly that was what I wanted to anchor the space. To frame it, I selected monumental chiseled glass sconces from Gaspare Asaro and a contemporary bronze bench from Wexler Gallery. The walls are sheathed in faint gold paper with a custom design by de Gournay, and the ceiling is covered in a handmade paper by Holland & Sherry, all topped off with a Ted Abramczyk chandelier. A bright curry embossed leather from Foglizzo covers the door in this second passage to the butler’s pantry to make sure you know there’s more good things to come just through the doorway.

Wesley Moon

Wesley Moon

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